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Geylang – a neighborhood in the city-state of Singapore.




Geylang is a neighborhood in the city-state of Singapore; east of the Central Area; that is in Singapore’s central business district.

Overview

• It is located to the east of the Singapore River.
• This is an area that locals have associated, from the days of Sir Stamford Raffles, as a Malay kampong opposite facing two islands Batin and Rokok.
• It was reclaimed to make space for Singapore’s first commercial airport opened in 1937.
• The airport control tower has been preserved that served, in its day.
• It is now an observation deck and is today used by the People’s Association.
• Geylang, under the British administration, was thought to be outside the limits of the city proper.
• It was hence considered suitable for the siting of Singapore’s first commercial airport.
• The hangars for repair for the light aircraft can still be seen today that have been slated by the Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA).
• Micro-businesses founded by Malay, Indian and Chinese entrepreneurs seized start-up opportunities.
• They took up work as mechanics in bicycle or motor repair workshops, suppliers of wood for making boats, houses, furniture and as merchants in iron, of floor and roofing tiles, in rubber and later plastics for all kinds of marine, industrial, factory and home use, including the mosaic of temples, mosques and churches in Geylang.
• One of the distinctive hallmarks of Geylang architecture is the preservation of its shophouses used by the clan (kinship) associations.
• Geylang neighborhood accurately reflects demographic changes in Singapore.
• The word Geylang is found early in Singapore’s history.
• It shows marsh and coconut plantations beside and adjacent to the mouth of the Kallang river, home to the Orang Laut (sea gypsies).
• One possible etymological link in the stock vocabulary of the Malay is ‘geylanggan’ meaning to ‘twist’ or ‘crush’.
• The Geylang area is composed of north and south sections that are divided by Geylang Road.
• This road stretches for about three kilometers.
• Throughout the length of Geylang Road, there are lanes that extend perpendicularly from the main road.
• The lanes in the north are given odd numbered names (i.e. Lorong 1, Lorong 3, Lorong 5 and so on), and the lanes in the south are given even numbered names (i.e. Lorong 2, Lorong 4, Lorong 6 and so on).
• Geylang’s combination of shophouse scenery and hectic day and night life, including foreign workers quarters and karaoke lounges provides an alternative view of elements the rest of modern Singapore
• Shop-houses along Geylang Road are protected from redevelopment, and several famous eateries have sprung up along the major road.

Events of Singapore

– Singapore Food Festival
– Singapore Grand Prix
– Singapore Arts Festival
– Chingay Parade
– World Gourmet Summit
– ZoukOut
– Singapore Sun Festival
– Christmas
– Singapore Jewel Festival

Singapore has four official languages
– English
– Chinese
– Malay
– Tamil

Places to see in Singapore

1. Beaches and Tourist Resorts
• Three beaches on Sentosa and its southern islands.
• East Coast.

2. Culture and Cuisine
• Chinatown for Chinese treats
• Little India for Indian flavors
• Kampong Glam (Arab St) for a Malay/Arab experience
• East Coast for delicious seafood

3. History and Museums
• The Bras Basah area east of Orchard.
• North of the Singapore River: Singapore’s colonial core

4. Nature and wildlife
North and West
• Singapore Zoo
• Night Safari
• Jurong Bird Park
• Botanical Gardens
• Bukit Timah Nature Reserve
• Pulau Ubin, an island off the Changi Village in the east
• Tortoise and turtle sanctuary in the Chinese Gardens on the west side of town

5. Skyscrapers and Shopping
• Orchard Road
• Singapore River
• Bugis and Marina Bay

6. Places of Worship
• Vast Kong Meng San Phor Kark
• Monastery near Ang Mo Kio
• Colorful Sri Mariamman Hindu temple in Chinatown
• Psychedelic Burmese Buddhist Temple in Balestier
• Stately Masjid Sultan in Arab Street

Things to do in Singapore

• Golfing
• Surfing
• Scuba diving
• Ice skating
• Snow skiing
• Gambling
• Races
• Spas
• Swimming
• Water-skiing
• Wake-boarding
• Windsurfing
• Canoeing
• Cable-Skiing
• Wave surfing

Best time to visit/climate

– Singapore is located a mere 1.5 degrees north of the Equator.
– Weather is usually sunny with no distinct seasons.
– Rain falls almost daily throughout the year.
– Most rainfall occurs during the northeast monsoon (November to January).
– Between May and October, forest fires in neighboring Sumatra can also cause dense haze.
The temperature averages around:
– 30°C (84°F) daytime, 24°C (76°F) at night in December and January.
– 32°C (90°F) daytime, 26°C (81°F) at night for the rest of the year.

Location on Google Maps


View Larger Map

Or click and paste the URL below on your browser:
http://maps.google.co.in/maps?q=Geylang&hl=en&hnear=Geylang,+Singapore&gl=in&t=m&z=14

How to get to Geylang?

To get to Geylang Road, there are several MRT stations in the vicinity of Geylang Road.
• Aljunied station
• Kallang station
• Dakota station
• Mountbatten station
• Paya Lebar station

There is also the Geylang Lorong 1 Bus Terminal situated in the Kallang planning area.

How to reach Singapore?

1. By Plane
• Singapore is one of Southeast Asia’s largest aviation hubs.
• The easiest way to enter Singapore is by air in addition to flag-carrier Singapore Airlines.
• Its regional subsidiary is SilkAir.
• Singapore is also home to low-cost carriers Tiger Airways, Jetstar Asia and Scoot.
• Changi airport: The country’s main airport and major regional hub status.
• Seletar Airport: Seletar Airport is Singapore’s first airport.

2. By Road
• Singapore is linked by two land crossings to Peninsular Malaysia.
• The Causeway is very popular.

3. By Bus
There are buses to/from Kuala Lumpur (KL) and many other destinations in Malaysia through the Woodlands Checkpoint and the Second Link at Tuas.
Major operators include:
– Aeroline
– First Coach
– NiCE
– Transnasional
– Transtar

4. By Train
• Singapore is the southern terminus of Malaysia’s Keretapi Tanah Melayu network.
• There are two day trains (the Ekspres Sinaran Pagi and Ekspres Rakyat) and a sleeper service (Ekspres Senandung Malam) daily from Kuala Lumpur.
• A day train (the Lambaian Timur departing Singapore at 4:45AM).
• Sleeper (Ekspres Timuran departing at 6PM) daily along the “Jungle Railway” between Singapore and Gua Musang.

5. By Boat
Getting to/away from the ferry terminals:
• HarbourFront FT: Located next to HarbourFront MRT station.
• Tanah Merah FT: Get off at Bedok MRT station and catch bus No. 35 to ferry terminal.
• Changi FT: No bus stop nearby, take a taxi from Changi Village or Tanah Merah MRT.
• Changi Point FT: Take bus No. 2, 29 or 59 to Changi Village Bus Terminal and walk to the ferry terminal.

6. Cruises
• Star Cruises offers multi-day cruises from Singapore to points throughout Southeast Asia, departing from HarbourFront FT.
• Common destinations include: Malacca, Klang (Kuala Lumpur), Penang, Langkawi, Redang and Tioman in Malaysia, as well as Phuket,Krabi, Ko Samui and Bangkok in Thailand.
• There are also several cruises every year to Borneo (Malaysia),Sihanoukville (Cambodia), Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnam) and even some 10 night long hauls to Hong Kong.

Some travel books from Amazon about Singapore

Lonely Planet Singapore Frommer’s Singapore Day by Day Malaysia and Singapore

Places to stay (hotels / restaurants along with website / contact numbers)

Hotels at wikitravel.org
Hotels at hotels.online.com.sg
Hotels at expedia.co.in

Blogs/Sites about Singapore – Geylang

Blogs at streetdirectory.com
Blogs at wikitravel.org
Blogs at expedia.co.uk
Blogs and reviews at hotels.online.com.sg

Images and photos of Singapore – Geylang

Images at google.com
Images at streetdirectory.com
Images at hotels.online.com.sg
Images at imagesofsingapore.wordpress.com




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