January 2010
M T W T F S S
« Dec   Feb »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Trip to Goa (India) (land of beaches, greenery and churches) – Part 2 – Visit to fort and beaches




The first post in this series (link) was about our first day in Goa, including the arrival and spending many hours at Calangute, accompanied by rain throughout. It was still fun, even though there was a lot of rain. When we reached back at the resort, we decided to plan for the next day and soon enough discarded the option of using the standard package tourist bus (not enough time when we want to spend more time at one place), and decided to hire a taxi for this purpose. Soon enough, we had tied up with a taxi for this purpose, and decided to start at 10 in the morning the next day.
However, when we got up the next day, it was still raining, and we decided to wait it out. The problem was, time moved from 9 to 10 to 11, and yet the rain showed no sign of letting up. So, we finally gave up and decided to call the taxi operator and he soon arrived, and we were ready to start. Dropped were any clothes that were meant for the beach, and included were umbrellas. The sights we had to see were basically 2 different types – one was the old fort, and the other was the beaches located ahead of Calangute.
The first place we were headed off to was the Aguada Fort, located on a hill.

Entrance to Aguada fort along with view of Arabian sea in Goa
Entrance to Aguada fort along with view of Arabian sea in Goa

The older lighthouse inside the Aguada fort in Goa, a historic structure
The older lighthouse inside the Aguada fort in Goa, a historic structure

People wandering on the concrete platform in the middle of the Aguada fort in Goa
People wandering on the concrete platform in the middle of the Aguada fort in Goa

The Fort is a place of historic significance, and a protected place. It was also the scene of a few Hindi movie sets, and was built by the Portuguese in the 17th century, in 1612 precisely, to guard against Dutch and the Marathas. The fort is fairly well-preserved, standing on the Sinquerim beach, overlooking the Arabian Sea. It is south of Candolim, and was tasked as a reference for vessels coming from Europe (with its lighthouse providing that purpose). The name of the fort refers to the word ‘water’, since Aguada means water, and refers to a fresh water spring within the fort that provided water for drinking purposes. In a later part of its history, during the Salazar administration, the fort was used as a prison. Now, the area around the fort is owned by the Indian Hotel Co, owned by the Tata group, and is a 5 star resort.

People at ruins of the fort near the Taj resort near Aguada Goa
People at ruins of the fort near the Taj resort near Aguada Goa

Rain hit path right next to the Tata Indian Hotels Resort 5 star resort in Goa
Rain hit path right next to the Tata Indian Hotels Resort 5 star resort in Goa

There is parking outside the fort, and then a slight uphill journey from the place of parking to reach the fort. Once we get inside, there are two levels inside the fort. The main ground inside the fort contains a main structure that shows the water tank, and is fairly large. The slightly elevated inside the fort is along the perimeter wall of the fort, which is a good walk as well as provides a good view of the Arabian sea from there, and of the surrounding green hillside.

Perimeter wall of Aguada Fort in Goa along with moat
Perimeter wall of Aguada Fort in Goa along with moat

View of green countryside next to Aguada Fort in Goa along with the Arabian Sea
Photo of view of green countryside next to Aguada Fort in Goa along with the Arabian Sea

The signboard giving the history of the Aguada fort in Goa along with an explanation of the upper and lower portions of the fort
The signboard giving the history of the Aguada fort in Goa along with an explanation of the upper and lower portions of the fort

After spending many hours in the fort and enjoying the view (the rain would lessen in between, but the overall weather was excellent). From here, we decided to try to see whether going to the other fort would make sense. There is another fort nearby, called Chapora Fort, much less preserved than the Aguada Fort. The Chapora fort is much older, and is built overlooking the Chapora river. Built over an earlier fort, the current fort was built in 1717, and with steep slopes on all sides. The guides over there discourage you from going to the fort since it is a steep climb, and is in a much more ruined condition. However, the views are supposed to be excellent; we however could not visit the fort since it was raining a bit harder and the climb was not really recommended.
After the forts, we decided to move to the beaches in that region. The most famous beach that we visited was called Baga beach, and is a long beach. At one end of the beach, there is the Baga creek, and makes for a good view, since it is not often that you get to see a view of a creek or stream flowing into the sea. A huge number of visitors visit Baga beach on a regular basis, and the beach is also fairly long. We spent some time in the water, although with lifeguards coming forward to warn visitors not to go too deep into the water. However, it was pleasant spending some time in the surf. And then, since we were getting hungry, we decided to eat at a recommended place over there, a shack called Britto’s where there was some excellent sea food (but not much choice for vegetarians). Once done with Baga beach, we moved onto 2 more beaches, the Vagator beach and the Anjuna beach.

The road outside Baga beach in Goa, a narrow road with many vehicles passing by
The road outside Baga beach in Goa, a narrow road with many vehicles passing by

The water of the Baga creek merging with the sea at Baga beach in Goa
The water of the Baga creek merging with the sea at Baga beach

Line up of beach chairs at the Baga beach in Goa
Line up of beach chairs at the Baga beach

Enjoying at Baga beach, waiting for the water to inundate and cover
Enjoying at Baga beach, waiting for the water to inundate and cover

Relaxing at the edge of the water at Baga beach in Goa
Relaxing at the edge of the water at Baga beach

Vagator was a nice beach, although one had to again walk for some distance (including walking down a very small hill) to get to the beach, but once at the beach, it looked beautiful. You could see a group of people enjoying themselves in the water, and we spent some time at the beach, enjoying ourselves. Then the light started dropping, and it was time to move on to the last beach for the day, Anjuna beach. I had heard that Anjuna beach was very famous, but somehow I did not get the same impression; it was rocky and seemed dangerous for somebody who would venture into the water, unless they were somewhat skilled. It was fun walking on the rocks though, heading farther out into the water.

People enjoying the surf at Vagator Beach in Goa
People enjoying the surf at Vagator Beach in Goa

View of Vagator Beach in Goa from a height, a bit of rock, but also some beautiful beach
View of Vagator Beach from a height, a bit of rock, but also some beautiful beach

Photo of view of Anjuna Beach in Goa, seen from a height
View of Anjuna Beach in Goa, seen from a height

Photo of People standing on the rock at the edge of the water in Anjuna Beach in Goa
People standing on the rock at the edge of the water in Anjuna Beach

Water lapping the shore of the Arjuna beach in Goa in India
Water lapping the shore of the Arjuna beach, with the rock getting hit by the waves

Photo of The water hitting the rocks at the shore pretty hard at Anjuna Beach in Goa, India
The water hitting the rocks at the shore pretty hard at Anjuna Beach

And with sunset having fallen, we headed back to our resort, a nice comfortable day. As you might see, we were not the more adventurous type, not having planned to just hire a bike and go wherever it takes us; although in the rain, hiring a bike was likely to be a daft move.




Leave a Reply

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>